Anderson, Hans Christian


Hans Christian Andersen (/ˈændərsən/, Danish: [hæns kʰʁæstjæn ˈanɐsn̩] (About this soundlisten); 2 April 1805 – 4 August 1875), in Denmark usually called H.C. Andersen, was a Danish author. Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, he is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen’s popularity is not limited to children; his stories express themes that transcend age and nationality.

Andersen’s fairy tales, consisting of 3381 works[1] and translated into more than 125 languages,[2] have become culturally embedded in the West’s collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as well.[3] His most famous fairy tales include “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” “The Little Mermaid,” “The Nightingale,” “The Steadfast Tin Soldier”, “The Red Shoes”, “The Princess and the Pea,” “The Snow Queen,” “The Ugly Duckling,” “The Little Match Girl,” and “Thumbelina.” His stories have inspired ballets, plays, and animated and live-action films.[4] One of Copenhagen’s widest and busiest boulevards, skirting Copenhagen City Hall Square at the corner of which Andersen’s larger-than-life bronze statue sits, is named “H.C. Andersens Boulevard.”[5]

Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Anderson

TWO BROTHERS

TWO MAIDENS

THE ANGEL

ANNE LISBETH

BEAUTY OF FORM AND BEAUTY OF MIND

THE BELL-DEEP

THE BEETLE WHO WENT ON HIS TRAVELS

THE BUTTERFLY

THE BELL

THE BOTTLE NECK

THE BIRD OF POPULAR SONG

THE BISHOP OF BORGLUM AND HIS WARRIORS

THE BRAVE TIN SOLDIER

THE BUCKWHEAT

BY THE ALMSHOUSE WINDOW

THE CONCEITED APPLE-BRANCH

THE CHILD IN THE GRAVE

A CHEERFUL TEMPER